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20121205
20121213
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
up before, how much cooperation from the c.i.a. dod from the whitehouse, a. and did it affect at all the release date? >> well the release date was generated by the production schedule. i only finished the movie i'd say about 10, 12 days ago. >> rose: right. >> so we couldn't have release this movie any earlier than we are releasing it now. >> rose: [indiscernible] >> it helps, it definitely helps but mark was reporting the story and he was the one communicating with various sources. and really kind of getting inside that community in order to tell this story as faithfully as we could. >> rose: what did you know, both of you, but what did you know before may that you were working on? what kind of story were you doing. >> i was completely focused on toraboa. >> rose: really. do you know why he got away from torabora. >> can we make that movie. >> i can show you in the movie. >> rose: can you make that movie now? >> i don't know. >> rose: you worked on it, you got the elements there. >> just like in story how they got them. there's no one piece of the intelligence puzzle. it's a
in a multimedia presentation with drone surveillance and video from the consulate of the cia and annex. >> this is supposed to be sovereign u.s. territory, and if people walk in on us like that without resistance really makes your blood boil because you think to yourself what's the security? >> a video was shown to the committee last month, but this is the first time the presentation was made to the entire house. one lawmaker who asked not to be identified who said in the classified naturr of the breech r, the video who assess because the attacker is casual. fox news told james clapper, the nation's top intelligence official emphasized, the attacker's motivation unknown, and there was further questions about the obama administration's singular and immediate focus on the anti-islam video? >> why did you just focus on that part for so long rather than say, look, it's not a black and white issue. >> one of the motivations may very well be either the video, the response to the video in cairo, and, certainly, that's not ruled out. >> fox news has confirmed the decision to shut down the cia
questions as well. i would point to the issue over the cia talking points and these decisions to make changes that critics say really minimize the role of al qaeda and affiliated groups in this attack, martha. martha: certainly got the right people in the room to answer a lot of those questions. we'll see if they get anywhere conclusive today. you know one of the big issues that has been raised by all of this of course, catherine, is our intelligence on the ground in benghazi. what are we learning about the future of that annex and our presence there? >> reporter: fox news has learned that the decision to close the cia annex and to destroy all of the classified information and move out the classified communications equipment came within 12 hours, 12 hours of the at dark -- attack on the consulate itself and early morning september 12th, by 8:00 local time, effectively the cia operation in benghazi was shuttered. all the classified information was moved or burned as well as the equipment and this was a decision fox was told was made on the ground. then there was notification to washing
in the world. our cia are out there all over the world but they have to get information. they collect it and analyze it. look at what happened in benghazi. that's another issue. we knew that it was a hot spot, but we didn't have intelligence that they were going to attack. >> greta: therein proves my point. that was another intelligence where we might have the hardest working people in the world, the best in the world but the fact is intelligence failures do happen with even the best. that's why it's very hard to have a lot of sort of comfort in terms of what happens with these, you know, chemical weapons should assad leave. >> no question. >> greta: mistakes happen. >> we can't be the sheriff for the whole world, so we have to work with other countries an other allies. as serious as the situation is in syria, we've got to work with russia. >> greta: let me ask you a quick question. you've actually met president assad. tell me your impression. >> on our way to iraq we had to go -- we were asked to go and stop by to see assad. this was right after, maybe six months after president obam
down the cia annex happened in the early morning hours of september 12th after the annex took indirect fire from two mortars. while the annex was cleared of classified information and equipment, in less than 10 hours to this day the consulate, which is less than a mile away has never been secured, harris. >> catherine herridge, thank you very much. >> you are welcome. >> we massive battle on the streets of capital today right outside the presidential palace. people said to be hitting each other with stick and stones and fire bombs. can you see that yourself. dozens reported hurt. that country descending deep near chaos. it is a key ally in that region. something we are watching closely. we will go live to cairo in moments. don't know whether you are ready to start thinking about america's next presidential election. a new poll shows who people say they would back to succeed president obama. also, we'll show you how a couple of possible republic candidates are already putting together the framework for 2016. >> the old ways won't do. we need new thinking and renewed efforts from all ame
was -- after he won the election, and that is that the cia program, whether you find it repugnant or not, actually was effective with ksm and other people getting actionable intelligence that led to couriers that led eventually years later to the killing of osama bin laden. >> joe and mika, i saw a screening of the film on friday, and then i had breakfast on saturday with the screenwriter. it is powerful precisely because it just walks you through the story of what happened. and you can make all of the moral and political arguments that you want about what our policy on torture should be. this just tells you the story of what happened. there's no question in the record that the film shows and in other research that i've done that the name of the courier who led us to bin laden's hideout in abbottabad emerged in these harsh interrogations. and there's a weird way in watching this film in which every viewer will feel complicit in that process in a weird way. you're watching, hoping that they get the name, hoping that somehow you get enough information for the united states to act. it's a r
through what he is going to do with cia director, with national security advisor, if any changes coming there, and maybe by presenting a whole team, including a new defense secretary nominee at the same time. some of the attention from this back and forth in a more partisan sense can be deflected in a more positive direction. >> thank you very much. michael, thanks for giving us real perspective on that op ed from the "new york times". appreciate that vemp. >> thank you, andrea. >>> the music world has suffered a nuj loss overnight. cross border singing sense station jenni rivera died when a small private jet carrying her and members of her entourage crashed in northern mexico. called the diana ross of mexican music, rivera was a hero among latin women and major player in a genre of music dominated by men. not only did she sell more than 20 million records, but her empire included radio and tv. her reality tv show on telemundo's sister network mundoz elhave aed her to millions. she leaves behind five children and two grandchildren. she was only 43 years old. ♪ but some things never ge
. they have a number for some of their devices. host: the cia director has to go to the defense secretary and say, this is how i want to spend my money? guest: the officer of the director of national intelligence that we have had since 2004 is responsible for negotiating the relationship with the secretary of defense. it is a difficult relationship. the department of defense is always tempted to reach into the intelligence of say, why is there another $2 billion over there? let me squeeze you down a little bit. intelligence says, no, don't do that. guest: we have now added more layers of bureaucracy. host: on twitter, remember all of this spending contributes to gdp. cut military spending, and there will be job losses, economic slowdown. guest: every drawdown we have done has involved the decline in employment in the pentagon. in the 1990's, we took 700,000 people in active duty forces. it was bush and clinton who did it. it started under bush in 1989. 300,000 civil servants, down from 1 million at the time. if the bulk of the active duty force structure, the civil service, would have to
of terrorist ties. phillip mudd, a former cia and fbi counterterrorism official, says there's a huge concern over who to trust with chemical weapons. >> when you've got roughly 10% of the opposition in the. >>>s u.s. government is declaring are terrorist group you're going to be concerned. in any case like this, there's a lot of risk. >> reporter: but mudd says it's still better to train the rebels on how to handle those materials than to do nothing. and leonard specter says the u.s. and its allies are likely screening the individuals who are being trained very carefully, wofrl, at least that's the hope. >> despite all that, there's still a potential for these chemical weapons getting into the wrong hands. despite what the u.s. is trying to do. >> reporter: phillip mudd says if the syrian regime loses control of these weapons, that's a huge worry. if they fall into the hands of others who are not trusted by the u.s. or its allies they could float around the border to iraq or other potentially dangerous places where they don't have control over these things. if assad loses control of these th
. host: the cia director has to go to the defense secretary and say, this is how want to spend my money? guest: the officer of the director of national intelligence that we have had since 2004 is responsible for negotiating the relationship with the secretary of defense. it is a difficult relationship. the department of defense is always tempted to reach into the intelligence of say, why is there another $2 billion over there? but we squeeze you down a little bit. -- let me squeeze you down a little bit. intelligence says, no, don't do that. guest: would have no added more layers of bureaucracy. -- we have now added more layers of bureaucracy. host: on twitter, remember all of this spending contributes to gdp. cut military spending, and there will be job losses. economic slowdown. guest: every drawdown we have done has involved the decline in employment in the pentagon. in the 1990's, we took a 700,000 people in active duty force. it was bush and clinton who did it. it started under bush in 1989 and. 300,000 civil servants, down from 1 million at the time. if the bulk of the active duty
a cia spy drone it captured back in 2011. that country's revolutionary guard has previously said that it recovered some information from the unmanned craft, but this time technicians say they have broken through all of its encryption, revealing that the drone had not carried out missions over any nuclear facilities before it went down. >>> well, north korea is extending the launch period for a controversial long-range rocket by a full week. its top scientists blame what they call a technical problem. north korea's government insists the rocket launch is part of a plan to put a satellite into orbit. however, the u.s. and our allies say the launch is really cover for testing missile technology that could be used to hit as far away as america. david piper live in bangkok, thailand, with the very latest. david? >> reporter: hi, megyn, yes. that famous phrase, houston, we've got a problem, well, the normally-secretive north korea has announced they've got a problem also with their planned missile launch over the next few weeks. now, what the spokesman for north korea said was that the
confessed being agents for the cia and the mossad and the mi6. even the public wonders how much time that have during the week for public services. no one believes that. not a single irony and believes that these people who served the revolution in the first decade have completely become counterrevolutionaries. the kite the it is used to instigate and put fear into the heart of the iranian public. the prime minister was chosen by the ayatollah khomeini. is he is not safe and has to appear on show trial and people were capped at ministers have to appear, and i, as a simple iranian citizen, i am totally at their mercy. this is the change which has taken place. >> thanks, ali. emanuel, want to move on to you about the indifference that marina felt during her imprisonment about the outside world and given ali's surveys and that having panels on the human rights record of iran is somewhat of a novelty in washington -- what does that say about what the west is doing? what measures are the united states taking specifically aimed at iran of its human rights record as opposed to poor for rati
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)